Day 1 - Monday, January 27, 2014

9:00
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Day 2 - Monday, September 29, 2014

9:00
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Day 3 - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

7:30
Registration Opens and Continental Breakfast
8:30
Opening Remarks from the Co-Chairs
8:45
ITAR Parts 120 and 121 and Export ControlReform – Which Parts and Components RemainITAR-Controlled: How to Define “SpeciallyDesigned” and Determine ITAR Jurisdiction overDefense, Commercial and “Dual-Use” Items
9:45
How to Define ITAR-Controlled “TechnicalData” and “Defense Services”: CommonMisunderstandings and Pitfalls That Can Triggeran Export Violation
10:45
Networking Coffee Break
11:00
ITAR SECTIONS 120.3 and 120.4 – How to StructureYour Classification Approach and Draft a CJ Request
12:00
ITAR Sections 120.10, 120.17, 124.1, 125.2, 125.3and 126.18 — Determining the Level of EmployeeAccess to Your Controlled Technical Data: Howto Comply with New Foreign, Dual and ThirdCountry National Rules and Incorporate Theminto TAAs and MLAs
1:00
Networking Luncheon for Attendees and Speakers
2:00
How to Prepare ITAR Licenses and Agreements,and Reduce the Risk of RWAs: A Step-by StepGuide to Filling Out Applications, Electronic Filingand Providing Supporting Documentation
3:15
Networking Coffee Break
3:30
Taking Your Company through the Export ControlReform Transition: How to Implement theTransitional Rules Affecting ITAR Agreements,DSP-5s, and Brokering
4:30
The Biggest Misunderstandings about ITARLicensing Exemptions
5:30
ITAR Compliance Program and Supply Chain BestPractices: How to Develop and Implement EffectiveCompliance Manuals, Policies and Procedures
6:00
Boot Camp Concludes

Day 1 - Monday, January 27, 2014

9:00
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA

Day 2 - Monday, September 29, 2014

9:00
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

Day 3 - Tuesday, October 21, 2014

7:30
Registration Opens and Continental Breakfast
8:30
Opening Remarks from the Co-Chairs

James D. Slear
Partner
Thompson Coburn LLP

Nancy Ceglarski
Manager, International Trade Compliance
Northrop Grumman Corporation (Rolling Meadows, IL)

8:45
ITAR Parts 120 and 121 and Export ControlReform – Which Parts and Components RemainITAR-Controlled: How to Define “SpeciallyDesigned” and Determine ITAR Jurisdiction overDefense, Commercial and “Dual-Use” Items

Tony Dearth
Director, Office of Defense Trade Controls Licensing
Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, U.S. Department of State

Michael Laychak
Deputy Director Defense Technology Security Administration
U.S. Department of Defense (Washington, DC)

  • When are defense articles, technology and related services “ITARcontrolled”: What is covered by the U.S. Munitions List (USML)
  • Who Does What: Roles and jurisdiction of DDTC and DoD
  • Clarifying ITAR application to commercial and “dual-use” items
  • The “specially designed or modified” reach of the ITAR, the “seethrough” rule and their application to your products
  • Identifying when foreign commercial products and technology can become ITAR-controlled
  • Commingling and integrating commercial and defense technologies: Identifying ITAR “taint” of your commercial products and services

9:45
How to Define ITAR-Controlled “TechnicalData” and “Defense Services”: CommonMisunderstandings and Pitfalls That Can Triggeran Export Violation

Ben Gaffield
Corporate Technology Control Officer and Director, Trade Compliance
Elbit Systems of America

Bart McMillan
Partner
Baker & McKenzie

Technical Data

  • Defining “technical data” and “export” of technical data
  • Determining whether technical data is in the “public domain” under 120.11
  • Identifying whether technical data is ITAR-controlled
  • Recent DDTC guidance and expectations on how to control technical data
  • Reducing the risk of technical data export violations in offshore procurement ventures
  • Complying with restrictions governing “technical” discussions

Defense Services

  • What are “defense services” under the ITAR
  • How the broad definition of “defense services” affects commercial companies
  • How U.S. persons can engage in ITAR-controlled “defense services” by simply providing public domain information
  • How “defense services” can cover technical data related to EARcontrolled
  • items

10:45
Networking Coffee Break
11:00
ITAR SECTIONS 120.3 and 120.4 – How to StructureYour Classification Approach and Draft a CJ Request

Kristin Smith
Executive Director, International Trade Compliance
UTC Aerospace Systems (Rockford, IL)

Joseph D. Gustavus
Principal
Miller Canfield

Tony Dearth
Director, Office of Defense Trade Controls Licensing
Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, U.S. Department of State

Michael Laychak
Deputy Director Defense Technology Security Administration
U.S. Department of Defense (Washington, DC)

Through a review of sample CJs, best practices and common pitfalls, this hands-on, practical session will provide you with a solid foundation for preparing CJ requests and deciding when to file a CJ instead of conducting a self-determination. The session will also address how DDTC and DTSA review CJ requests, and recent trends in jurisdictional determinations.

  • Preparing a CJ request: What you need to submit, what supporting material to include and other key elements
  • DDTC Guidelines for preparing CJ requests: What the State Department expects and how to expedite the process
  • Who should prepare CJ requests and when
  • Key factors affecting CJ determinations: Recent trends in rulings and lessons learned
  • How to interpret CJ determinations, and what you can do with the CJ after you obtain it

12:00
ITAR Sections 120.10, 120.17, 124.1, 125.2, 125.3and 126.18 — Determining the Level of EmployeeAccess to Your Controlled Technical Data: Howto Comply with New Foreign, Dual and ThirdCountry National Rules and Incorporate Theminto TAAs and MLAs

James D. Slear
Partner
Thompson Coburn LLP

Dean Powell
Director, Trade Compliance-North America
Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems Corporation

Sol Brody
Director, Export/Import Operations
Raytheon Missile Systems (Tucson, AZ)

  • How DDTC defines “foreign national”, “dual national”, “third country national”, “U.S. person” and “access”: Impact of changes to dual and third country national requirements under 126.18, and available exemptions
  • How the ITAR addresses the sharing of technology with foreign persons inside and outside the U.S.
  • Screening and interviewing foreign nationals without discriminating on the basis of national origin:
  • Reconciling the ITAR with EU, Australian and Canadian human rights and privacy laws
  • Incorporating export controls language into your offer letters, employment agreements and using non-disclosure agreements (NDAs)
  • Assigning foreign persons to ITAR sensitive areas: Avoiding deemed export/re-export violations, and to how to badge non-U.S. persons
  • Outsourcing IT and engineering activities overseas: Complying with ITAR restrictions
  • Controlling visitor access to restricted areas

1:00
Networking Luncheon for Attendees and Speakers
2:00
How to Prepare ITAR Licenses and Agreements,and Reduce the Risk of RWAs: A Step-by StepGuide to Filling Out Applications, Electronic Filingand Providing Supporting Documentation

Tony Dearth
Director, Office of Defense Trade Controls Licensing
Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, U.S. Department of State

Bart McMillan
Partner
Baker & McKenzie

Michael Laychak
Deputy Director Defense Technology Security Administration
U.S. Department of Defense (Washington, DC)

ITAR Licenses

  • When a DSP-5, DSP-73, or DSP-61 , DSP-85, TAA, MLA or WDA is required: The approvals process, how to expedite the process, timeframes and how to reduce the risk of delay
  • Ensuring you get hardware and tech data included on a single license
  • Returns: Special considerations
  • Licenses in furtherance of agreements
  • Constructing an accurate scope of export in your license application
  • Drafting a license application: What to include, how to fill out the forms using DTrade2, and how to submit the application for
  • When to use a letter of intent to support a license request
  • What DDTC expects beyond the written guidelines
  • Structuring and valuing license authorizations
  • Key reasons for RWA (Returns without Action) or license denials, and how to prevent them

ITAR Agreements

  • When and how to get TAAs, TAA Amendments, Re-Baselined TAAS and MLAs
  • When to cover foreign nationals under MLAs and TAAs
  • Degree of information expected by DDTC and DTSA in TAA scope of export and statement of work
  • What DDTC and DTSA expect beyond the written guidelines
  • Analysis of sample TAAs and MLAs

3:15
Networking Coffee Break
3:30
Taking Your Company through the Export ControlReform Transition: How to Implement theTransitional Rules Affecting ITAR Agreements,DSP-5s, and Brokering

Dean Powell
Director, Trade Compliance-North America
Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems Corporation

Sol Brody
Director, Export/Import Operations
Raytheon Missile Systems (Tucson, AZ)

Nancy Ceglarski
Manager, International Trade Compliance
Northrop Grumman Corporation (Rolling Meadows, IL)

At this interactive session, gain first hand industry insights on how to weather the transition and avoid key pitfalls that can affect your organization’s ITAR compliance status. Hear success stories and benefit from a worthwhile opportunity to ask your questions.

4:30
The Biggest Misunderstandings about ITARLicensing Exemptions

Joseph D. Gustavus
Principal
Miller Canfield

  • Key exemptions and their limitations, including:
    • U.S. person abroad/U.S. subsidiary
    • U.S. Government exemption
    • Canadian exemption
    • Return and repair exemption
    • Temporary Imports
    • FMS exemption
    • Re-exports to NATO, Australia or Japan
    • UK and Australia ITAR exemptions
    • University fundamental research exclusion

5:30
ITAR Compliance Program and Supply Chain BestPractices: How to Develop and Implement EffectiveCompliance Manuals, Policies and Procedures

Ben Gaffield
Corporate Technology Control Officer and Director, Trade Compliance
Elbit Systems of America

Nancy Ceglarski
Manager, International Trade Compliance
Northrop Grumman Corporation (Rolling Meadows, IL)

ITAR Compliance Program

  • Key elements and best practices for effective ITAR compliance
  • Identifying and empowering the right internal resources and personnel
  • Developing and updating your compliance manual, procedures and processes, including policy
  • Statements and message from senior management
  • Creating an anonymous reporting tool and compliance hotline

Supply Chain, End-Use and End-User Screening

  • Where the exporter’s responsibility for third party compliance begins and ends
  • Vetting third parties, including subcontractors, freight forwarders, distributors, customs brokers, customers, re-sellers and others: What to look for and ask at the due diligence stage
  • Monitoring ITAR compliance of third parties
  • Recordkeeping: What documents/information to collect from foreign third parties, and how to review them
  • Building an effective end use/end user screening program
  • Safeguards to implement for orders and shipments, and when to terminate the relationship because of export enforcement risks

6:00
Boot Camp Concludes