Day 1 - Tuesday, February 24, 2015

8:00
Registration Opens and Refreshments are Served
9:00
Opening Remarks from Conference Chair
9:15
Why Do Lean Programs Fail, and What Can We Do About It?
10:00
CASE STUDY: The Lean Leader’s Role in Cultivating an Engaged Workforce
10:40
Networking Refreshment Break
10:55
CASE STUDY:Getting the Fundamentals Right and Moving Your Lean Programming Forward to the Next Step
11:40
CASE STUDY:Building Lean Muscle at General Microcircuits…One Improvement at a Time
12:25
Networking Luncheon for Delegates and Speakers
1:35
CASE STUDY: Improved Performance by Investing in your Performers – Workforce Development Programs as an Engine for Positive Change
2:20
CASE STUDY:Recruiting and Inspiring the Leaders You Need to Take the Next Step in Your Lean Journey
3:05
Networking Refreshment Break
3:25
The Georgia Manufacturing Landscape: How APICS, GMA, and SME Work Together to Help Businesses Succeed
4:00
PANEL: How Does the Role of a Lean Professional Evolve in the Journey Towards a Continuous Improvement Culture?
5:00
Closing Remarks from Conference Chair, Conference Adjourns

Day 2 - Wednesday, February 25, 2015

8:30
Registration Opens and Refreshments are Served
9:00
Opening Announcements from Conference Chair
9:15
KEYNOTE: Building Sustainable Cultures of Excellence Based on the Shingo Model
9:45
CASE STUDY: Leadership, Lean Thinking, and the Journey to Winning a Shingo Prize
10:30
Networking Refreshment Break
10:50
Transformation Simplified: Creating a Sustainable Culture of Connectivity, Clarity, and Consistency
11:35
PANEL: Encouraging Ambition: What Does the Future of Lean Look Like?
12:35
Networking Luncheon for Delegates and Speakers
1:50
CASE STUDY: Applying Lean Principles to Energy Usage to Reduce Costs, Increase Performance, and Improve Productivity
2:25
Lean Product Development: How Should Lean Thinking Inform and Foster R&D Innovation and New Product Design?
3:10
Closing Remarks from Conference Chair, Conference Concludes

Day 3 - Thursday, February 26, 2015

9:00
WORKING GROUP A: Lean Applied to Business Processes — “Your Constraint may not be on the Shop Floor”
1:00
WORKING GROUP B: Step-By-Step Exercises to Improve Changeover Times, Processes, and Outcomes

Day 1 - Tuesday, February 24, 2015

8:00
Registration Opens and Refreshments are Served
9:00
Opening Remarks from Conference Chair
9:15
Why Do Lean Programs Fail, and What Can We Do About It?

  • Seeking the root causes behind why Operational Excellence programs often fail to meet their objectives
  • Proving that lean thinking only works if it starts from the top while building from the bottom
  • Demonstrating that progress is made through evolution, not revolution
  • Incorporating these truths into project planning and workforce development thinking

10:00
CASE STUDY: The Lean Leader’s Role in Cultivating an Engaged Workforce

  • Examining the unique role and responsibilities of leaders in transforming the culture and results of an organization
  • Demonstrating the power of Servant Leadership – Putting people first and expecting them to be extraordinary
  • Introducing practical leadership approaches that compel and empower the participants to move their organization beyond the constraints of the past and go to the next level of performance
  • Winning support through early successes, ongoing training, and a clear path forward for your workforce
  • Illustrating the value of soft skills of change management and effective communications to leaders of OpEx programs
  • Discussing different ways to bridge the cultural divide between lean thinkers and the rest of the company

10:40
Networking Refreshment Break
10:55
CASE STUDY:Getting the Fundamentals Right and Moving Your Lean Programming Forward to the Next Step

  • Talking about the role of leadership in launching and sustaining new initiatives
  • Walking through real-world examples of establishing and maintaining successful performance measurement systems
  • Embracing Plan-Do-Check-Act as both a mantra and a tool to constantly seek opportunities to evolve
  • Monitoring progress and learning from both success and failure to shape your processes
  • When is the right time for your lean journey to take the next step? What are the critical questions you need to ask of your people and processes?

11:40
CASE STUDY:Building Lean Muscle at General Microcircuits…One Improvement at a Time

  • Listening to your customers: How a client’s supplier assessment inspired us to do better
  • Collaborating with experts: How an E3 grant from NCSU IES helped jumpstart our lean journey
  • Using a multifaceted approach to fill your lean toolbox with what will work for you
  • Taking baby steps, holding on to success, and building on what is working
  • Leveraging learnings across facilities and functions to share good ideas
  • Showcasing progress so far both in the United States and in our Costa Rican operations

12:25
Networking Luncheon for Delegates and Speakers
1:35
CASE STUDY: Improved Performance by Investing in your Performers – Workforce Development Programs as an Engine for Positive Change

  • Building and operating a hands-on training system of use to every facet of your organization
  • Creating opportunities for your workforce to learn and grow as individuals, as leaders, and as part of a team
  • Educating your team to identify waste and impediments to productivity and generate value
  • Learning from your team to find the real KPIs that determine productivity, environmental performance, and cost savings
  • Building capabilities that drive integrated improvements across quality, service, and cost outcomes
  • Demonstrating the ROI of investing in training

2:20
CASE STUDY:Recruiting and Inspiring the Leaders You Need to Take the Next Step in Your Lean Journey

  • When is the right time to start building a Lean Leadership Team?
  • Who should strategically be the earliest members? Offering best practices and working examples to identify and influence engagement
  • Creating a learning and sharing environment that inspires lean thinking individually and as a team
  • Building a training and working culture that encourages cross-functionality, job shadowing, and mentoring as tools to cultivate holistic thinkers
  • Taking the next step: Working with the Lean Leadership Team to launch their own lean initiatives and teach others
  • Discussing lessons learned so far in the journey towards a truly team-led, self-managing Continuous Improvement workforce

3:05
Networking Refreshment Break
3:25
The Georgia Manufacturing Landscape: How APICS, GMA, and SME Work Together to Help Businesses Succeed
4:00
PANEL: How Does the Role of a Lean Professional Evolve in the Journey Towards a Continuous Improvement Culture?

  • Outlining the lean executive’s role in the planning and early decision-making stages behind performance management initiatives
  • Debating how important a leader is as the catalyst for change at different stages of the lean journey
  • Offering ideas and experiences to grow and mature the lean professional’s skillset and practical knowledge over time
  • Understanding the role of lean education in developing a learning organization
  • Identifying the tipping point where an organization transforms from management-drive lean programming into a continuous improvement culture
  • What does a lean executive do when senior management declares “Mission Accomplished”?

5:00
Closing Remarks from Conference Chair, Conference Adjourns

Day 2 - Wednesday, February 25, 2015

8:30
Registration Opens and Refreshments are Served
9:00
Opening Announcements from Conference Chair
9:15
KEYNOTE: Building Sustainable Cultures of Excellence Based on the Shingo Model

  • Offering an overview of the past, present, and future of The Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence
  • What differentiates ‘good’ from ‘great’ when we talk about lean programming and lean culture?
  • Identifying the key systems and behaviors that cultures of sustainable continuous improvement all have in common. How are these qualities developed and maintained over time?
  • Demonstrating the impact strong leadership, clear goals, and open communication have in producing long-term positive results
  • Showcasing case studies of the Shingo Model in action. What can lean executives take away from these examples?

9:45
CASE STUDY: Leadership, Lean Thinking, and the Journey to Winning a Shingo Prize

  • Sharing the story of how Barnes Aerospace Fabricators’ lean journey contributed to:
    • More than 950,000 hours worked without a lost time incident
    • A 53% reduction in scrap and rework and a 55% reduction in lead-time
    • A 28% increase in on-time delivery
    • Utah Manufacturers Association’s Manufacturer of the Year award and the Quality Management System Award in 2013
    • A Shingo Silver Medallion in 2011 and the Shingo Prize in 2014
  • Talking about the importance of leadership on both the shop floor and in the head office
  • How does the role of the leader evolve as a culture of Continuous Improvement matures within an organization?

10:30
Networking Refreshment Break
10:50
Transformation Simplified: Creating a Sustainable Culture of Connectivity, Clarity, and Consistency

  • Embracing a sensible and business-focused leadership methodology that promotes employee involvement and empowerment
  • Understanding the roles process and personality have in powering your organization’s performance
  • Making collective accountability visible and personal to transform and inspire workforce engagement
  • Creating a communication cadence that drives focus, urgency, and accountability
  • Discussing working leadership tools to promote ongoing improvement in communication, productivity, employee satisfaction, and bottom-line business results
  • How do you plan to build a leadership legacy of accountability rather than dependency?

11:35
PANEL: Encouraging Ambition: What Does the Future of Lean Look Like?

  • What is the next “Big Idea” for lean manufacturers? Where should we go from here?
  • Setting far-reaching goals beyond the plant floor that scare you: People, sustainability, innovation, marketshare
  • Building bridges between manufacturing operations and larger business plans
  • Incorporating the needs and wants of your suppliers and your customers into your lean journey
  • Positioning lean as a critical component of your organization’s growth strategy
  • Linking theory of constraints with lean thinking

12:35
Networking Luncheon for Delegates and Speakers
1:50
CASE STUDY: Applying Lean Principles to Energy Usage to Reduce Costs, Increase Performance, and Improve Productivity

  • Showcasing examples of easy wins and quick victories that eliminate waste and improve efficiencies in energy usage that convince people positive changes can be achieved
  • Encouraging input from all levels of the workforce and translating local successes into global best practices
  • Creating a system where success is reinvested into further efficiencies and improvements
  • Demonstrating how incremental improvements and ongoing changes in workforce culture can produce an enormous return over time
  • Offering ways to take these examples and lessons learned and apply it to your own operations

2:25
Lean Product Development: How Should Lean Thinking Inform and Foster R&D Innovation and New Product Design?

  • How should R&D and Lean Thinking align to improve the profitability of the company’s new product development?
  • Defining what Lean Thinking can and cannot do as companies seek new products and markets
  • Encouraging collaboration and input from manufacturers to design lean processes into the earliest stages of new product development
  • Illustrating successful collaborations in action based on real-world examples

3:10
Closing Remarks from Conference Chair, Conference Concludes

Day 3 - Thursday, February 26, 2015

9:00
WORKING GROUP A: Lean Applied to Business Processes — “Your Constraint may not be on the Shop Floor”

Even though your organization works long and hard to get results, does it seem like you’re just running in place? Do one or more of these scenarios sound familiar?

  • Sales and Marketing — Are proposals being issued late? Are they delivered incomplete—and being rejected? Do you have to reinvent the wheel for every sale?
  • Purchasing — Do you have a large investment tied up in inventory, yet you’re always running out of items and expediting buys because of poor planning?
  • Engineering — Are your engineers multitasking like crazy, but your product development and engineering change orders still can’t seem to keep up?
  • Human Resources — Are you having trouble replacing employees until long after they’re gone, and are you always starting at square one because they took their corporate knowledge with them? Is the learning curve long for new employees because everything depends on tribal knowledge — and the tribe is usually busy?
  • Legal — Are legal reviews holding up key areas of your business? And does every document look different even though each one covers the same territory over and over again?
  • Accounting — Is closing the books a heroic effort every month? Is there a lot of rework afterwards?
  • Finance — Are you paralyzed because finance takes forever to authorize your next move? And when you complain, does finance rightly argue that they need the time because there are so many irregularities involved?
  • Invoicing/Accounts Receivable — Do you have a long or unwieldy process to get back money you’ve invested? Are there typically lots of invoices in the system?
  • Strategic Planning — Does it take months to create a strategic plan, thereby guaranteeing it will be obsolete before it even gets off the ground? Spend more time tracking objectives than executing them?
  • Inspection — Has the number of necessary inspections grown disproportionately over the past ten years? Do the delays actually cost more than correcting potential errors would?
  • Audit — Do your internal auditors for external governmental organizations enforce policies and regulations far beyond the spirit of the law, slowing down your operation?
  • Management — Does decision-making bog down because the same issues are discussed in staff meeting after staff meeting, yet no one walks out the door with a single assignment to take constructive action or a clear method for measuring results?
  • Operations — Are your employees less productive than they could be because they’re waiting on any of the above?

Join us for this half-day workshop while we explore how lean thinking can go beyond the shop floor to identify and seek solutions to the true constraints impacting your organization’s performance.

A light lunch is provided to delegates participating in both Workshops A & B.

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Registration Opens at 8:30 a.m.)

1:00
WORKING GROUP B: Step-By-Step Exercises to Improve Changeover Times, Processes, and Outcomes

This hands-on four-stage simulation will make delegates think differently about how they plan, document, execute, and review their Clean-Up, Set-up, Start-Up processes. Based on interactive group activities, this workshop will teach attendees how to better…

  • Simplify and remove non-essential operations
  • Clarify the external and internal set-ups
  • Think critically about each step of the process
  • Communicate the plan effectively to the team
  • Document progress as you go based on quantifiable metrics
  • Review the finished process with a critical eye for further efficiencies

Participants can look forward to gathering new ideas and insights into changeover performance that will help to improve output quality, reduce inventory costs, enhance production flexibility, and drive on-time delivery goals.

Please note: Workshop participation numbers will be capped to maximize the delegate experience. Registration is available on a first-come, first-served basis

1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Registration Opens at 12:30 p.m.)